Publication Types:

Islamic Liberation Theology: Resisting the Empire

1. Englishv. Book Reviews
Halil Ibrahim Yenigun
(by Hamid Dabashi) AJISS 27/3 (2010): 100-102.
Publication year: 2010

By this provocative work – to say the least – Dabashi makes a quite timely intervention in the direction that the new discourse on Islam has recently taken, especially among progressive-liberal Muslim scholars. Unlike many others who are attracted to liberalism of various sorts, Dabashi remains closer to the socialist lineage to formulate a fervent anti-imperialist critique and struggle for justice in the line of liberation theologies of Gustavo Gutierrez and Joseph H. Cone. There have also been a few other Muslims pursuing a similar endeavor, such as Shabbir Akhtar and Farid Esack. Yet Dabashi, while retaining the basic sense of liberation theology, “articulation of the meaning of faith based on commitment to abolish injustice” (p. 254), is rather after a theodicy for our post-civilizational times. In his words, the aim is “to investigate the specifically Islamic manners of opposing the imperial upsurge in the aftermath of the ‘Islam and West binary opposition’” (p. 2).

On Shifting Ground: Muslim Women in the Global Era

1. Englishv. Book Reviews
Halil Ibrahim Yenigun
(ed. Fereshteh Nouraie-Simone) The Virginia Quarterly Review Summer 2006, 263-264.
Publication year: 2006

Fourteen distinguished scholars discuss how the interconnected web of economic globalization, transnational networks in new information technology, and the revival of Islam have opened up new opportunities for, and have in turn been transformed by, Muslim women. An underlying common theme of the contributors is their challenge to the colonially rooted, monolithic representation of Muslim women as voiceless and invisible victims (“behind-the veil”) of the Islamic patriarchy in both traditional and modern eras.

Essential History: Jacques Derrida and the Development of Deconstruction

1. Englishv. Book Reviews
Halil Ibrahim Yenigun
(by Joshua Kates) The Virginia Quarterly Review Summer 2006, 268- 269.
Publication year: 2006

In this new contribution to Derrida studies, Joshua Kates sets out to make up for the lack of a truly global interpretation of Derrida’s
thought. He seeks to develop a comprehensive view of Derrida, who has been lost in the rift between one camp that labels him a radical skeptic subscribing to linguistic determinism and another that sees deconstruction in greater proximity to traditional philosophy.

Crucial Images in the Presentation of a Kurdish National Identity: Heroes and Patriots, Traitors and Foes

1. Englishv. Book Reviews
Halil Ibrahim Yenigun
(by Martin Strohmeier) AJISS 22/1 (2005): 105-107.
Publication year: 2005

This book is primarily a history of the early Kurdish movement, from its inception in the late nineteenth century to the 1930s. Yet, its distinctiveness comes not from the Kurdish nationalists’ more publicized products, but from its focus on the margins of their literary attempts. This study of failed nationalism “is concerned less with how and why Kurdish nationalism did or did not ‘catch on’ than with the efforts made by [the] Kurdish elite to construct a viable concept of Kurdish identity” (p. 1). In other words, the author’s
main concern is to identify how images of the Kurds were constructed and represented, and how they evolved, over time, until the late 1930s.